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Is Singapore’s top troll SMRT Feedback in trouble over contempt of court?

They had republished Li Shengwu’s comments on the Singapore Government and the courts

PHOTO: FACEBOOK

SMRT Feedback by The Vigilanteh had on July 15 posted a criticism of Li Shengwu’s allegedly contemptuous remarks on Facebook. In doing so, they had also republished Shengwu’s original post.

Shengwu had shared a private link on his personal facebook page on the same day implying that the Singapore Government is trigger-happy on who they sue and that the Singapore courts can be easily influenced.

It is understood that Shengwu’s comment is tantamount to contempt of court, more specifically, the offence of scandalizing the court in Singapore. The Attorney-General Chambers is looking into the post.

The offence can be committed in various ways, including the following:

  • a publication in a print medium;
  • a television or radio broadcast;
  • pictures;
  • physical acts;
  • spoken words; or
  • words displayed on a poster.

In response to media queries, SMRT Feedback told Observer+:

“Our post was made under fair criticism, done in good faith and without prejudice to the Singapore court, the Government or our mothers. Criticism is fair when there is a rational basis for the criticism and the rational basis is accurately stated.”

– SMRT Feedback

When questioned as to how one evaluates if the post was done in good faith, SMRT Feedback said:

“On the ascertainment of good faith, one needs to not only take direct evidence but to also consider circumstantial evidence. In our case, SMRT Feedback is known for years to have at all times acted in good faith in matters concerning the Singapore judiciary, and have refrained from making comments that scandalises the powers that be.”

– SMRT Feedback

They added: “As such, our post could not in any way be characterised as a deliberate and provocative vilification of the Singapore courts.”

While SMRT Feedback may think that their actions are no cause for concern, only the AGC will have the discretion to decide.

They also had this to say to the haters: “They can all go #sukkok.”

Touché.

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